Wednesday, July 22, 2015

Pairing Sake with Food

By Liza B. Zimmerman

Japanese sake has long been a hard-to-understand beverage. It comes in various flavors and styles and is sometimes sparkling, unfiltered and even shows up in unpasteurized versions which are often called Nama--which means raw or fresh--sake. Its alcohol by volume content generally runs lightly more than a full-bodied wine, at 15 to 16 percent abv (or slightly higher). It has the maderized flavor of Sherry but is fermented from rice. The best ones are show better when served cold and its  flavor profiles run from light and fragrant to deep and full-flavored spirits that can even stand up well to fried foods and meat.

The Flavor Lexicon
I had the pleasure of eating at the Grand Hyatt in Tokyo on my first trip to Japan. Sake and its sibling cuisine is incredibly complex and layered. It often has most in common, for me, with the structure and balance of Italian food at its best, as there's always a place and time for each dish and drink and never the twain shall meat. Try asking for sushi and shabu shabu at the same restaurant and you see the kind the kind of look you get. Sake, according to Atsushi Sato the sake sommelier at the Grand Hyatt Tokyo, also has a natural flow during a meal. He says that a meal ideally should progress from a delicate Daiginjo sake with salads to a fresh-flavored Ginjyo with chicken or grilled fish. The last steps would be a rich, acid-driven Jyunmai with fried or grilled food, followed by an aged Koshu sake with lamb, cheese or after a meal. SakeOne's "Momokawa Diamond," Gunmai Ginjo from Oregon is one I have enjoyed with a range of foods. It's slightly off-dry flavor and mineral notes make it incredibly flexible in terms of food pairings.

Tips for Pairing
Sato says that one of the biggest challenges in pairing sake with food is that it's not a very self-assertive beverage. That can also be a benefit as its flavors, and lack of tannins, are unlikely to dominate a dish that isn't driven by animal fat or cream. He adds that sake's fermented, what we might perceive as "maderized nature," makes it also pair well with a wide range of cheese. You don't see the usual cheese cart at too many Japanese restaurants but we do love a healthy serving of it here and sake may well be a less-tannic pairing than red wine with these after-dinner treats.

That same deliciously oxidized flavor profile makes a good sake a delightful aperitif as well. You could even put it on the rocks or with a twist of orange (don't tell Sato San!). I won't do that with the best of them, but there's always room to experiment.

Cheers from DrinkUpNY!

Liza B. Zimmerman has been writing and consulting about wine and food for two decades. She is principal of the San Francisco-based Liza the Wine Chick wine writing, education and consulting firm. She has worked on staff and freelance at national magazines such as Wine Enthusiast, The Magazine of La Cucina Italiana, Wine Spectator, Where SF and the Examiner. She currently contributes to Cheers, Wine Business Monthly and the Examiner, among others.

Zimmerman focuses on demystifying wine and transforming it into a tool for business and networking for companies all over the country. Past clients include Genentech, Roche and IBM.

She has visited all the world’s major wine regions and is one of select few in the U.S. to hold the Diploma of Wine & Spirits (D.W.S.), the three-year precursor to the Master of Wine.

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Roasted Pork and Nebbiolo!

By Warren Bobrow, Cocktail Whisperer

G.D. Vajra "Albe" Barolo 2009 (Piedmont, Italy) is a remarkably delicious wine that is calling your name.  Not that I drink Barolo every night, far from- but for a special occasion, or if you are in the income bracket that makes a $ 35 dollar bottle of wine an everyday bottle- then this one is truly gorgeous. 

The Nebbiolo grape is a fickle beast.  It grows better as the soil becomes more rock-like and harsh.  Altitude is what Nebbiolo craves, steep slopes, fiercely pruned back and never, ever any irrigation.  This Nebbiolo aside from being hauntingly memorable, is a blend of grapes from each of Vajra’s vineyards.  The careful blending reveals the Terroir (or taste of the place) that is unique to this varietal. 

Nebbiolo is soft in the mouth with notes of citrus peel, crushed stones, trodden herbs, red fruits, a hint of liquorice and copious handfuls of rose petals perfume the palate.  This is wine for intellectuals as it forces you to drink carefully and boldly.  It’s not candy wine, nor is it too restrained- there is a happy medium at work in each sip.  You are forced by the very nature of the place to smile when you drink it.  This is happy wine indeed rolling in at about 14.5% alcohol, so make sure the food that you eat is robust and plentiful!

I love this wine for many reasons.  The first and foremost is the way it goes with food like wild boar, slow cooked with tomato, broth, sweet carrots, shallot and whole garlic cloves.  You need to cook a dish like this all day, preferably in an oven that goes low and slow for hours and hours without complaining.  In the villages of Italy, dinners were put into the oven the night prior in a local bakery.  As the ovens cooled overnight, the chemical reaction of slow heat to fatty, tough meat became magical.  When a cup or so of the Nebbiolo was introduced to carrots, celery, onion, shallot, rosemary and garlic with some bone broth and freshly ground salt/pepper- well, let’s just say it’s magical!

You should always cook with the wine you are drinking, lest the flavors be out of balance and I NEVER advocate cooking with wine that has gone sour- or turned, otherwise the dish will be ruined by the bad wine.  Think!  Bad wine in, bad sauce out.  Don’t do it!  I’ll come find you and it won’t be pretty…  Ok, so I won’t find you- but really, there is no such thing as cooking with sour wine- it’s just not done!

My pork dish for cooking all day is the normally tough cut from the Butt.  This is not the rear end, but the shoulder of the porcine delight.  This cut needs low and slow braising and patience to reveal itself.  I took a 5-pound pork butt into this recipe- I’d start with one that size for two people and go up from there- with certainly enough in leftovers!

Ingredients Nutrition
Servings – depends on how hungry you and your friend is…

1: (5 lb.) pork shoulder butt, roast
•    10 whole garlic cloves with one end cut off, but unpeeled
•    ½ cup Heinz Ketchup or 1 #10 can of crushed tomatoes
•    ¾ cup Demerara sugar or Moscovado sugar for a deeper flavor
•    1 teaspoon sea salt
•    1⁄2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
•    1 cup G.D. Vajra "Albe" Barolo 2009 (Piedmont, Italy)
Directions
1.    Make small slits all over the roast then insert a whole garlic clove into each slit
2.    Place the roast in a cast iron pan with a lid, Le Creuset works…
3.    Sprinkle the roast on all sides with the Heinz Ketchup
4.    Let sit at room temperature (lightly covered with foil) for at least 2 hours.
5.    After 1-1/2 hours spoon any Heinz Ketchup (if any) back on the roast that has accumulated on the bottom of the casserole.  Add the wine at this time…
6.    Using hands press raw sugar well into the meat on all sides making certain that the sugar sticks to the meat.
7.    Cover tightly.
8.    Preheat oven to 425 degrees F for 15 minutes.
9.    Place the roast in the oven and immediately reduce the temperature to 200 degrees F.
10.  Roast for at least 5 hours or until the meat is just falling apart (cooking time will vary depending on the size of the roast).
11.    Stir the salt and black pepper into the juice (do not omit the salt.  This is essential!).
12.    Let rest for at least a ½ hour before slicing
13.    Slice meat as desired.

Cheers from DrinkUpNY!

About Warren Bobrow
Warren Bobrow is the creator of the popular blog The Cocktail Whisperer and the author of nearly half a dozen books, including Apothecary Cocktails, Whiskey Cocktail and Bitters and Shrub Syrup Cocktails- his most recent book.

He's also written about cocktails for Saveur and Whole Foods/Dark Rye, Total Food Service, Eater, Serious Eats, Foodista, Distiller and Beverage Media among other outlets.  He’s taught the fine art of social media and food writing at the New School in New York and at the Institute for Culinary Education. Warren has also taught at Stonewall Kitchen in Maine.

Bobrow was a 2010 Ministry of Rum judge and was the only American food journalist asked to participate in Fête de la Gastronomie, a nationwide celebration of French cuisine in Burgundy. 

Wednesday, July 8, 2015

Pairing Wine with Seafood

By Liza B. Zimmerman


Summer is here and if you live anywhere near the Coast you will be digging into some freshly caught seafood. Nothing tastes as good as lobster right out of the water in Maine, fresh oysters that smell like the sea or a big bowl of steamed clams drenched in butter.

With seafood I am all about what grows together going together. I don' think that I have ever had a finer pairing than the heaps of oysters pulled out of the Bay of Arcachon, a sleepy little fishing village just outside of Bordeaux, with the local white wines. You could taste the same salinity in the White Bordeaux that was in the oysters.

Keeping it Coastal
Almost any wine made in the vicinity of sea, bay or ocean breezes is going to pair well with seafood. Muscadet from the Loire Valley is divine with most sea creatures as you can smell and feel the salt of the sea when you sip it. Almost all of the Loire Valley whites--from Sancerre to Pouilly-Fumé--are great choices.

The costal areas of Spain and Portugal offer some spectacular wines that cry out for a big platter of simply grilled or steamed seafood. The far north of Portugal produces wines from native grapes such as Trajadura and Loureiro and the region's soft and fruity Vinho Verdes are as good on the palate as they are on the wallet.

Their are few things that pair better with simple seafood than a great Albariño: especially from Rias Biaxas in Northern Spain. A handful of California producers have also been making some solid interpretations of this wine from regions from Santa Ynez to the Russian River.

Classics and Wild Cards
A beautifully balanced, but not too yeasty, Champagne is always a match made in heaven with oysters and lobster. Fairly dry domestic versions from California and New Mexico--particularly Gruet--will also do the trick. Spanish Cavas, and Italian Proseccos as well as Franciacorta, would also be good picks.

Unless the seafood is prepared in some kind of red sauce you are going to have a hard time finding a red wine that won't taste tinny and metallic with much of it. The use of tomatoes or anchovies will form a flavor bridge that can create synergies between some Southern Italian-style preparations of dishes of shrimp and other seafood, or Portuguese stews. Again low tannin and low-alcohol wines would be best with these dishes.

Many of the reds from Puglia, particularly those made from local grape such as Primitivo, can have modest alcohol levels of close to 13 percent. Despite its hot climate, Sicily also excels in making some seafood-friendly reds from cool climate areas and grapes such as Nerello Mascalese and Frappato. Spanish indigenous varitals such as D. Ventura's "Vina Do Burato" Rib

Cheers from DrinkUpNY!

Liza B. Zimmerman has been writing and consulting about wine and food for two decades. She is principal of the San Francisco-based Liza the Wine Chick wine writing, education and consulting firm. She has worked on staff and freelance at national magazines such as Wine Enthusiast, The Magazine of La Cucina Italiana, Wine Spectator, Where SF and the Examiner. She currently contributes to Cheers, Wine Business Monthly and the Examiner, among others.

Zimmerman focuses on demystifying wine and transforming it into a tool for business and networking for companies all over the country. Past clients include Genentech, Roche and IBM.

She has visited all the world’s major wine regions and is one of select few in the U.S. to hold the Diploma of Wine & Spirits (D.W.S.), the three-year precursor to the Master of Wine.
Photo Credit: NFI

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Wines for the 4th of July

By Liza B. Zimmerman

Great wines to enjoy, hopefully on a blanket in the park in the sun, for this country's anniversary should have fizz, spice and substance. My family used to have a lobster salad-based picnic in Central Park near where I grew up on the Upper West Side and everyone brought something to eat and drink.

There were bubbles, big muscular reds and unusual Croatian wines that had been sitting in people's basements for way too long. However we always had fun with the pairings: joked about them and always voted on what worked best with that super mayonnaise-infused lobster salad.

Start Fresh and Clean
Fizzy and acidic whites are great to start a meal. It might also be reverent to drink a few domestic sparklers here. Some beautiful ones are coming out of Washington State, some of which are off-dry crowd-pleasers. They are also supremely affordable.

California is also producing some lovely sparkling wine, both from smaller producers, as well as the siblings of Champagne houses. Spanish Cavas and Italian proseccos are also great on their own and even fun with a slash of tonic water or Martini Bianco.

Crisp white from everywhere from the Central Coast of California to the Northern parts of Spain are also likely to work well with salads, hard cheeses and olives with which you might start off a meal. Sauvignon Blanc is always a great bet as are many of the Iberian varietals--hello Verdelho--that are being grown with lots of success in places as diverse as Lodi and tk.

White Rhône varitals are also refreshing, although generally richer in style and taste profile. Regions such as Paso Robles on the Central Coast of California and producers in mid and Eastern Washington are also producing some great wines from Marsanne, Roussanne and Viognier such as the Magnificent Wine Company's House Wine which is primarily Chardonnay with a touch of white Rhône grapes.

Go Spicy
Not everyone wants the lobster salad so bring on the BBQ, or get take from your neighborhood Korean! Rich, charred meat flavors call for sustainable reds with lots of tannins and intense fruit and sometimes earthy notes. Rhone reds can be among the most animal-flavored--yes I do meant hat in a good way--of the bunch. They those tar and mineral, umami notes that can stand up to beautifully cooked meat even with a somewhat spicy marinade.

For simple preparations of meat, maybe just a strip stake made on the grill, a fruit-juicy California Cabernet Sauvignon might do the trick. Or a lower alcohol Zinfandel, once they get over 14.5+ percent of alcohol they may seem too candied to work with food.

Syrah from Walla Walla can also take on those great meal flavors, as can peppery and spicy Spanish blends based on Grenache. Argentine Malbecs are also classics, but generally for steaks with a lot of smoky charr on them and a simple marinade.

With pork loin or ribs, you could you go lighter and fruitier, maybe even uncorking a little sparkling Lambrusco from Italy or stepping back into a sustainable white from Northeastern Italy or the Rhone.

Cheers from DrinkUpNY!

Liza B. Zimmerman has been writing and consulting about wine and food for two decades. She is principal of the San Francisco-based Liza the Wine Chick wine writing, education and consulting firm. She has worked on staff and freelance at national magazines such as Wine Enthusiast, The Magazine of La Cucina Italiana, Wine Spectator, Where SF and the Examiner. She currently contributes to Cheers, Wine Business Monthly and the Examiner, among others.

Zimmerman focuses on demystifying wine and transforming it into a tool for business and networking for companies all over the country. Past clients include Genentech, Roche and IBM.

She has visited all the world’s major wine regions and is one of select few in the U.S. to hold the Diploma of Wine & Spirits (D.W.S.), the three-year precursor to the Master of Wine.

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

A bit Asian Influenced: Roasted Chicken

By Warren Bobrow, Cocktail Whisperer


Bonny Doon Vin Gris de Cigare 2013 (California) is one of those wines that get into your brain deeply, especially with roasted white meats and fish.

Last night was no exception for this wine.  I had roasted a Murray’s Chicken, a perfect little Pennsylvania bird, stuffed it with whole shallots and ginger with some fresh tarragon, sage and thyme thrown in for good measure.  All tightly knit flavors that are steeped in nostalgia for me.  The combination of these ingredients makes this roast free-range bird sing with possibilities.

For those who don’t know Bonny Doon wines- none other than extreme-garragist, Randall Grahm, creates each one of his conceptions with passionate care.  

Randall is the very personification of doing less to the soil and more for the soul of his drinkers.  The wines consistently impress me as they emerge from his larder, as they speak volumes to those of us who are looking for something different and therefore inimitable in the marketplace.   I like Randall’s wines for their independence and their charisma.  They speak clearly of the place where they are made and they call out to drinkers because of their originality. 

Bonny Doon wines don’t try to be like any other wines from California, or anyplace for that matter, so drawing a correlation to the much better known (read advertised brands) make it difficult at best. 

I could go so far as to say that Bonny Doon wines remind me of the handmade, Shinn wines from the North Fork of Long Island, certainly for their unique Biodynamic approach and they also speak a language that says the Languedoc in France, a region misunderstood throughout history for their individuality of flavor.   There is really nothing wrong with originality, right?

Of course, Bonny Doon wines have their own specific Terroir that can only read: California. 

The Vin Gris de Cigare is a lithe and playfully amusing wine, tightly wound around a core of stone fruits and minerals.  Each sip bursts with grapefruit zest and sea salt dusted hazelnuts.  Coming into view on each sip are wet stones, crushed green apples and freshly cut French herbs.  There is a hint of white pepper and a whiff of strawberries drizzled in white balsamic vinegar on the finish.  This wine finishes crisp and dry.  It begs you to take another sip. (Sip me!)

As a day-drinking wine in the hot sun, I can think of none better.  And with an Asian influenced roasted chicken, well this wine is just brilliant to wash down the succulent herb crusted bird.   The wine is under twenty dollars and should do very well with about a year or two of bottle age, but “drink up” because it’s too good to forget about in your cellar. 

A bit Asian Influenced: Roasted Chicken
Preheat your oven to 420 degrees…
4-5 pound Free Range chicken-washed and dried inside and out
Fresh herbs like thyme, tarragon, and sage
2-3 whole shallots, ends cut off but not peeled
1- 3-inch piece of ginger root, again- not peeled
Freshly cracked pepper
Sea salt
Garlic bulb- top cut off with knife and the small cloves stuffed into the bird, the remainder set beside the bird to caramelize

Preparation:
Rub the chicken inside and out with salt/pepper
Chop herbs finely and rub inside and out
Stuff cavity with shallots, garlic cloves and ginger root
Set the garlic bulb (with the top cut off) next to the bird to soak up the cooking juices
Roast at 420 Degrees for 45 minutes
Drop Temperature down to 300 for another hour or so
Turn oven off and let rest in the oven for 20 minutes or so
Slice as desired and serve with well-chilled glasses of the Vin Gris

Makes a heck-of-a chicken salad sandwich!

Cheers from DrinkUpNY!

About Warren Bobrow
Warren Bobrow is the creator of the popular blog The Cocktail Whisperer and the author of nearly half a dozen books, including Apothecary Cocktails, Whiskey Cocktail and Bitters and Shrub Syrup Cocktails- his most recent book.

He's also written about cocktails for Saveur and Whole Foods/Dark Rye, Total Food Service, Eater, Serious Eats, Foodista, Distiller and Beverage Media among other outlets.  He’s taught the fine art of social media and food writing at the New School in New York and at the Institute for Culinary Education. Warren has also taught at Stonewall Kitchen in Maine.

Bobrow was a 2010 Ministry of Rum judge and was the only American food journalist asked to participate in Fête de la Gastronomie, a nationwide celebration of French cuisine in Burgundy. 

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Wines for Father's Day

By Liza B. Zimmerman

My dad only drinks Champagne. And a touch of sparkling wine. So I might fête him with a classic bottle Gosset Brut. If we were going to go domestic he might enjoy a California sparkler or delicious bottle of Gruet, that he might even think was Champagne.

While my father is not much on rosé sparklers, yours might be and there are plenty of good ones being made everywhere from New Mexico to Cavas in Spain and Proseccos in Italy. Rosé sparkling wines also tend to be very food friendly and can pair with all kinds of flavors from spice to sweetness and umami flavors.

Some fathers like to celebrate with big reds for Father's Day. The Sobon Estate "Fiddletown" Zinfandel is big and muscular but soft and luscious. Other big, meaty red worthy of the BBQ you might help him make to celebrate would include some inky Cabernet Sauvignons, intense peppery Malbecs from Argentina or a mysterious red blend such as the Spanish Cims del Monstant, which has rich layers of Grenache and Carignan.

Wines for a Sunny Day
If you want to take your dad for a picnic in Central Park, to the beach or for a ride on the Cyclone at Coney Island. Beautiful summer weather would call for lighter wines: perhaps a little Sancerre if your dad likes oysters and other fresh, shelled delights from the sea. Bright and crisp Sauvignon Blancs are also favorites of mine to sip outside. South Africa and Chile are some to some of the world's best versions of these wines, and often among the most affordable. Regions all over California are also distinguishing themselves by producing some stellar and balanced bottlings of Sauvignon Blanc as well.

In France truckers drink pink wines in the summer and they are no less macho. So why not toast dad with a little rosé? Mulderbosch from South Africa is a rich and intense wine made from Cabernet Sauvignon. Bordeaux and Spain's Navarra region also make some luscious, fruit-forward roses. If dad is adventurous have him try the Di Giovanna "Gerbino" Rosato di Nerello Mascalese. This is a rosé made from one of Sicily's truly great cool climate grapes.

For An Old-School Dad
To wrap up his day you dad might enjoy a little fortified wine. A Cognac, such as Pierre Ferrand's "1840 Original Formula" from Grande Champagne in Cognac is a classic. A touch of sherry is as nice after a meal as before. Savoring the layers of a vintage or Tawny Port is a another great way to conclude the celebration. Calem is a great producer.

Cheers from DrinkUpNY!

Liza B. Zimmerman has been writing and consulting about wine and food for two decades. She is principal of the San Francisco-based Liza the Wine Chick wine writing, education and consulting firm. She has worked on staff and freelance at national magazines such as Wine Enthusiast, The Magazine of La Cucina Italiana, Wine Spectator, Where SF and the Examiner. She currently contributes to Cheers, Wine Business Monthly and the Examiner, among others.

Zimmerman focuses on demystifying wine and transforming it into a tool for business and networking for companies all over the country. Past clients include Genentech, Roche and IBM.

She has visited all the world’s major wine regions and is one of select few in the U.S. to hold the Diploma of Wine & Spirits (D.W.S.), the three-year precursor to the Master of Wine.

Wednesday, June 10, 2015

Recipe: Salade Nicoise

By Warren Bobrow, Cocktail Whisperer

Back in the early part of the 1990’s I had a chance to travel to Europe for a month.  The trip started like many of my trips to Europe have in the past- with the idea of eating well and drinking even better throughout the trip while visiting some lovely countries.

Europe, to the neophyte is not at all like visiting the international food court at the Plaza Hotel in NYC or visiting the Epcot Center International Dining Pavilion when at Disney in Florida. 

There is a certain authenticity that comes from actually visiting a place, and tasting their culinary history, not by opening a four-color travelogue on the web and hoping for inspiration to come from all the appealing pictures.  To experience authentic European food and wine you must go to the source.  That place can be found by making airline reservations and flying across the pond to eat and drink wine like the locals!

During my halcyon, month-long sojourn, I found my way to the southern part of France, near the Riviera.  This region is long known for its relaxed way of life.  The air is hotter there, both dry and tropical in temperature.    Viniculture reflects the ambient temperatures and the terroir (taste of the place) from the growing medium.  This makes for wines that speak clearly of hot winds that seem to suck all the moisture out of your body.  Fortunately for the thirst-driven traveler, there are many choices for the adventurous palate.

Chateau Beaulieu Coteaux D'Aix-En-Provence Rose 2014 is a perfect introduction to the expressive wines from the South of France, sip by thirst quenching sip.  This wine in particular compliments the food that comes from the South of France.  It was specifically created to make you feel cooler inside when the outside air is over 100 degrees, the wind is blowing forty knots and the air is dry, dry, dry....

The rose wines of this region are defined by the cuisine of the place and no other dish says Aix more than the classic Salade Nicoise.

This singular experience is the framework for wines that say crisp, aromatic and refreshing.  Rose wine like the brilliantly made Chateau Beaulieu, speaks the language of the Garrigue. Garrigue is quite simply the sum of the parts- of the flavors found in herbs that live in the scrub brush. 

This flavor of Garrigue defines the rose wines of Provence. 

When I got off the TGV train from Paris to Nice, the first thing I wanted to do was find a café where hopefully I could get a perfectly delicious glass of the local wine and a Salade Nicoise.  The Salade Nicoise is the quintessential experience of Aix en Provence.  The historic square is surrounded by cheerfully adorned tables, each turning out perfectly delicious versions of the classic salad comprised of butter lettuces, green beans, olives (cured in oil), tuna (cured in oil-NEVER water), ripe tomatoes (or substitute roasted tomatoes should yours resemble the color of khaki pants)…  There should be anchovies in there along with capers and freshly torn parsley.   Your vinaigrette should be made with finely minced shallots along with tarragon vinegar  (or Champagne Vinegar if you wish) and smashed garlic.  There are also boiling potatoes in there along with perfectly (would they be anything else but?) hard-boiled eggs. 

The social thread of this ancient town passes through each bite and each sip that you take of a Salade Nicoise.  It is, quite frankly, France in every taste and scent. 

Recipe for the Salade Nicoise
2-3 small heads of Boston Lettuce- well washed and dried
1 pound French Green beans, steamed to just done with a pinch of baking soda in the water (makes the green color come out vividly)
2 Tablespoons shallot, minced finely
Sea Salt (Like Maldon) and Freshly Cracked Pepper (a must!)
4 very ripe tomatoes (or roast less than perfect- but ok, plum tomatoes in a 350 degree oven for an hour until they melt into themselves.  Let cool and use in your recipe)

My basic vinaigrette is:
¼ cup of the best French Extra Virgin Olive oil that you can buy…
¼ cup Tarragon or Champagne Vinegar
Freshly chopped rosemary and thyme
1 tablespoon shallot (minced fine)
1 garlic clove (boiled for 20 seconds – this takes the bitterness out)

mash garlic clove into the side of a wooden bowl, with a wooden spoon
mash shallot into the bowl –along with the garlic
add the olive oil, salt and pepper and begin to mash that into the garlic and shallot
add the fresh herbs- continue mashing
add the vinegar to finish…
Hard boiled eggs cook for 7 minutes at a boil, started cold- then to boil.. remove from heat, cool with lid on.. cool
Potatoes are easy, simmer with skin on until done, ½ hour or so, let cool
Green beans, steamed (pinch baking soda) cool
Lettuce washed and dried..

It’s really a very simple salad.. toss the greens with the vinaigrette, add the eggs, green beans, the potatoes, the oil cured- tuna and the tangy capers and serve with your well iced bottle of Chateau Beaulieu Coteaux D'Aix-En-Provence Rose 2014…

It’s a trip to France in the summer-time in every bite! 

Cheers from DrinkUpNY!

About Warren Bobrow
Warren Bobrow is the creator of the popular blog The Cocktail Whisperer and the author of nearly half a dozen books, including Apothecary Cocktails, Whiskey Cocktail and Bitters and Shrub Syrup Cocktails- his most recent book.

He's also written about cocktails for Saveur and Whole Foods/Dark Rye, Total Food Service, Eater, Serious Eats, Foodista, Distiller and Beverage Media among other outlets.  He’s taught the fine art of social media and food writing at the New School in New York and at the Institute for Culinary Education. Warren has also taught at Stonewall Kitchen in Maine.

Bobrow was a 2010 Ministry of Rum judge and was the only American food journalist asked to participate in Fête de la Gastronomie, a nationwide celebration of French cuisine in Burgundy.